Kansas Department of Corrections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Kansas Department of Corrections
KDOC
KS - DOC.png
KSDoCorrections.png
Agency overview
Employees3,549
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdictionKansas, USA
Kansas Department of Corrections is located in Kansas
El Dorado
El Dorado
Hutchinson
Hutchinson
Lansing
Lansing
Leavenworth
Leavenworth
MJRCF
MJRCF
Topeka
Topeka
Kansas Prisons — green=state, red=private (Hover mouse over pog to popup clickable link)
Map of Kansas Department of Corrections's jurisdiction.
General nature
HeadquartersTopeka, Kansas

Agency executive
Website
doc.ks.gov

The Kansas Department of Corrections[1] is a cabinet-level agency of Kansas that operates the state's correctional facilities, both juvenile and adult; the state's parole system; and the state's Prisoner Review Board. It is headquartered in Topeka.[2]

Correctional facilities[edit]

The Kansas Department of Corrections operates eight adult correctional facility sites, three satellite correctional facility sites and one juvenile correctional facility.[3]

Community & Field Services[edit]

The community and field services division[5] has two units - parole[6] and community corrections.[7]

Victim Services[edit]

The Office of Victim Services (OVS)[8] provides confidential support and information to victims, survivors, and witnesses if the offender in the crime was sentenced to incarceration in the Kansas Department of Corrections. Services provided include victim notification,[9] safety planning,[10] victim restitution,[11] parole comment session advocacy, Victim/Offender Dialogue (VOD) program,[12] facility tours, and apology letters.[13]


Kansas Correctional Industries[edit]

The department uses inmate labor to produce products such as office furniture, park equipment, and clothing for state government. Workers are paid very small sums allowing KCI to undercut conventional businesses.[14]

Staffing[edit]

The department has suffered staff shortages for many years. [15] In 2017, press reports indicated a turnover among the guards of 46% per year. A 10% pay raise increased the hourly wage for uniformed employees to $14.66 but did not include non-uniformed staff.[16] The El Dorado facility was authorized a staff of 682, but about a quarter of the positions were vacant.[17]

By 2019, the department was forced to contract with CoreCivic to move six hundred prisoners to Arizona due to staff shortages. At that time, the department reported an overall inmate population of 10,002 indicating about ten percent of the population was to be moved out of state.[18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Home Page, Kansas Department of Corrections Archived 2009-11-28 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Contacts, KDOC.
  3. ^ "Facilities Management — Kansas Department of Corrections". www.doc.ks.gov. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  4. ^ "Admission RDU." Kansas Department of Corrections. Retrieved on December 6, 2915.
  5. ^ "Community & Field Services — Kansas Department of Corrections". www.doc.ks.gov. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  6. ^ "Parole Services — Kansas Department of Corrections". www.doc.ks.gov. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  7. ^ "Community Corrections — Kansas Department of Corrections". www.doc.ks.gov. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  8. ^ "Office of Victim Services — Kansas Department of Corrections". www.doc.ks.gov. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  9. ^ "Notification Program — Kansas Department of Corrections". www.doc.ks.gov. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  10. ^ "Safety Planning — Kansas Department of Corrections". www.doc.ks.gov. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  11. ^ "Financial Restitution and Compensation — Kansas Department of Corrections". www.doc.ks.gov. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  12. ^ "Victim/Offender Dialogue Program — Kansas Department of Corrections". www.doc.ks.gov. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  13. ^ "Apology Letters — Kansas Department of Corrections". www.doc.ks.gov. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  14. ^ "About Us". Kansas Correctional Industries. Retrieved 23 September 2019.
  15. ^ Woodall, Hunter (3 August 2017). "As prison staff shortage worsens, Kansas lawmakers question corrections chief". Kansas City Star. Retrieved 23 September 2019.
  16. ^ Editorial Board (18 August 2017). "Editorial: Gov. Sam Brownback finally raises pay for Kansas prison guards, but will it be enough?". Kansas City Star. Retrieved 23 September 2019.
  17. ^ Editorial Board (1 August 2017). "Editorial: 'Like a powder keg ready to explode' — how bad will Kansas prisons get before officials take action?". Retrieved 23 September 2019.
  18. ^ Bowman, Randy. "Kansas Department of Corrections Signs Contract for Out-of-state Prison Beds". Kansas Department of Correction. Retrieved 23 September 2019.

External links[edit]